Posted in Reading Materials

Read Kerouac, Ginsberg, Corso, and Burroughs (part 1 of 4)

I’ve been wondering why all these authors were grouped together. According to Wikipedia’s entry; “The Beat Generation was a group of American post-World War II writers who came to prominence in the 1950’s, as well as the cultural phenomena that they both documented and inspired. Central elements of “Beat” culture included rejection of received standards, innovations in style, experimentation with drugs, alternative sexualities, an interest in Eastern religion, a rejection of materialism, and explicit portrayals of the human condition”

On the Road by Jack Kerouac

I am so happy I can finally say I finished reading “On the Road” by Jack Kerouac! I don’t why, but it’s taken me over a year to get through this book. I can cross off 1 out of the 4 authors. Although, these other authors are featured a bit in the book so I almost can stop here. But I won’t, I’ll try to get through one book by each person.

I started reading this book and immediately noticed that there were no paragraphs or chapters. Guess that’s what they mean by Kerouac’s spontaneous prose style of writing. He rambled on and on about people and his adventures between the years 1947 to 1950. I think that is what made it hard for me to get into the story. The rambling, odd descriptions of what was happening, how he viewed other people, side thoughts or insights, and tangent stories. I told my mom that it felt like I sat down with Kerouac to hear about his adventure over a drink. We all get that way (mostly) with telling someone about a trip right? Start a story, remember other stories, go off on tangents, and then go back to the main story. And there’s no breaks, unless you would count another person interrupting the storyteller.

I had to ask for clarification on a few slang terms and expressions. And after a few pages of reading, I forgot what I had read before. Got the gist of everything, but if I had to go back to write a better review, or a paper on this, I would basically have to reread it all over.

After finishing the book, I am now curious on reading some papers delving into what people think he was writing about and see what they interpret as the meaning behind or into the story. I didn’t understand the difference in this edition as opposed to the original edition published in 1957. It is pretty cool that he first typed this story up on one long piece of paper (120-foot roll of teletype paper), hence why the “scroll”. Later on, he had to break it up and write on normal sheets of paper. He also changed the names of the characters in the story so there would be no libel suits. I read names like Jack Kerouac, is also known as Salvatore “Sal” Paradise. And his other main character, Neal Cassady, is also Dean Moriarty.

It was hilarious, and I don’t think a spoiler, to get toward the end of the story and have it stop abruptly. I was about to get mad, but on the next page there was a note from the editor that it stopped there because the last bit of the scroll had been chewed off by a dog. The editor also noted that based on notes and Kerouc’s published story, he added the last bit.

I thought it interesting on Wikipedia’s page that they had a section of public reception for the book. Both for when it first was published and the current reactions to it, 50 years later. I would say the perception of the story and characters probably have changed drastically over the years.

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Posted in Monthly Checklists

Monthly List: October 2017

1915 Adopt a baby
1900 Attend the Blessing of the Animals at New York City’s Cathedral of St John the Divine
1897 Ballroom dance at the Rainbow Room
1908 Be a best boy
1910 Be a most valuable player
1920 Be in the Guinness Book of World Records
1909 Be intimate with ________
1912 Be radiant
1903 Become a beer connoisseur
1914 Deliver a baby
1898 Bicycle through Bordeaux
1895 Build a people pyramid
1901 Claim you were on the Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper album
1893 Construct a card house
1906 Cure depression
1907 Define your utopia
1919 Discover a new species in the rain forest canopy
1894 Erect a statue
1902 Harmonize the Star Spangled Banner
1904 Hire an escort
1905 Kiss women’s hands
1911 Know what a key grip does
1891 Know your senators
1899 Mime for money
1892 Play Nora in a Doll’s House
1913 Run through the car wash
1918 See a quetzal in the wild
1896 Sing backup
1916 Study Staniskavski
1917 Tame lions

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Posted in Home Town

See A Ghost

The Sacramento Old City Cemetery hosts a few lantern tours in the month of October. They sell out spaces quickly, and so last year, I marked on my calendar the end of August to be on the lookout for tickets. I bought one as soon as possible and couldn’t wait until the night came. I really wasn’t sure what to expect other then seeing gravestones at night. Would I get to see a ghost?

That night (which just happened on a full moon night), I walked in and had to run to join my tour group, as I got there a couple of minutes late. Luckily they had just started and had stopped at the first spot for a story. Turns out there were about 6 different grave sites that we stopped at and heard a story of the resident resting there. A narrator that dressed up and either portrayed that person or as someone that was involved in their story. Which was pretty cool, it is interesting to hear about some of the past life stories.

One of the stories was interactive, in that there were people from the group that became the “suspects” in a person’s murder and the narrator pointed to each one and gave the reason why that person might have murdered the man buried at the spot.

As we listened and walked, you could hear noises among the graves, and turn to look at what might be making them, sometimes it was a “ghost” just standing or kneeling. Other times, they were grave robbers digging up the graves. What really got us was that sometimes, a ghost or zombie like would come walking by us, going through our group, OR stopping and staring at one of us. There was one ghost that decided he like this one lady, well she decided that she didn’t like that and stepped around her husband to the other side of him. the ghost just followed. So she did a little circle walking to get away from him. It was entertaining to watch.

Midway through our tour of the cemetery, we stopped for hot chocolate, cider, and a snack. Sat down on bleachers and watched a short radio show murder story.

 

Then onto a few more graveside stories. The last one stuck with me. It was about a lady that like to dress up and rode into town on her horse. She lived a little out of town at a place called Mormon Island that was now covered by Folsom Lake. That was the first time I had heard about the island. She ended up dying by falling off her horse, but her bustle got caught in the saddle, so she was dragged along.Then this summer, with the drought being so bad, this Mormon Island became uncovered by Folsom lake and there was foundations and little bits and pieces found. It became a great fascination for other people to learn about this lost community.

It was definitely a fun little evening, and while I didn’t see a true supernatural ghost, this “ghostly” experience counts in my book. If ever I do have an encounter, you can be sure I’ll write about it.

Have you gone on any lantern / ghost tours? How about a real supernatural sighting?

Posted in Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, Super Duper Easy

Know the difference between ʻAʻā and Pāhoehoe

Time to look up the words in Wikipedia. Turns out these words are for two different types of Lava.

Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

ʻAʻā means “stony rough lava”, but also to “burn” or “blaze”) is one of three basic types of flow lava. ʻAʻā is basaltic lava characterized by a rough or rubbly surface composed of broken lava blocks called clinker. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

The loose, broken, and sharp, spiny surface of an ʻaʻā flow makes hiking difficult and slow. The clinkery surface actually covers a massive dense core, which is the most active part of the flow. As pasty lava in the core travels downslope, the clinkers are carried along at the surface. At the leading edge of an ʻaʻā flow, however, these cooled fragments tumble down the steep front and are buried by the advancing flow. This produces a layer of lava fragments both at the bottom and top of an ʻaʻā flow.

Accretionary lava balls as large as 3 metres (10 feet) are common on ʻaʻā flows. ʻAʻā is usually of higher viscosity than pāhoehoe. Pāhoehoe can turn into ʻaʻā if it becomes turbulent from meeting impediments or steep slopes. ʻAʻā lavas typically erupt at temperatures of 1000 to 1100 °C.

________________________________________________

Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

Pāhoehoe means “smooth, unbroken lava”), also spelled pahoehoe, is basaltic lava that has a smooth, billowy, undulating, or ropy surface. These surface features are due to the movement of very fluid lava under a congealing surface crust. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

A pāhoehoe flow typically advances as a series of small lobes and toes that continually break out from a cooled crust. It also forms lava tubes where the minimal heat loss maintains low viscosity. The surface texture of pāhoehoe flows varies widely, displaying all kinds of bizarre shapes often referred to as lava sculpture. With increasing distance from the source, pāhoehoe flows may change into ʻaʻā flows in response to heat loss and consequent increase in viscosity. Pahoehoe lavas typically have a temperature of 1100 to 1200 °C.

And that concludes the lesson for the day. Bucket List mission accomplished!

Posted in Bon Appetite, Drinks Galore, Requires Travel

Drink the Milk From a Coconut With a Straw

My sister is currently living in Hawaii so it is a tad more than just visiting her when I go. It’s very much a vacation in paradise. There are tons of “bucket” list adventures to cross off when on a tropical island. This was one from the book.

I had visited my sister in 2011 as a birthday vacation. We did quite a few items, like my first time stand-up paddling. While we were out on the beach, one of her co-workers went and chopped down a few coconuts from trees nearby. Then they cut into the coconuts so I could drink from it. (I had mentioned this being a checklist item to my sister, so she asked him to get them as a birthday treat).coconut 2 There were no straws, but you can’t beat having it fresh right? After we drank the juice (which was more like water then milk), they cut more of the coconut (which took a lot more chopping than I would have thought) and we dug out the meat. I’m not a fan of coconut, but it was fun to eat it still in the shell and so fresh.coconut 1Maybe, I’ll go buy one at the store (or better yet, have another opportunity in Hawaii like this) and use a straw. In the meantime, I’m counting this as mission accomplished.

Have you had any coconut related experiences?

Posted in Monthly Checklists

Monthly List: October 2016

1541 Allow yourself an outburst
1559 Attend the tulip festival in Seattle
1534 Blow off the obsequious
1550 Buy a sex toy
1533 Caveat emptor
1548 Chase a tornado
1556 Coin a great label for a generation
1543 Come from behind
1537 Consider the opposite
1544 Defy gravity
1551 Experience Brazilian Carnival
1552 Fall in love on public transportation
1539 Go undercover with a tape recorder
1535 Jump out of the cake
1536 Know the way out and the way in
1555 Live in a Soho loft
1557 Make homemade tortillas
1546 Master a kinky technique
1547 Meet the love of your life’s ex, and shake his or her hand and say “thank you”
1549 Memorize “Jabberwocky”
1538 Orbit the earth
1554 Play bebop
1545 Pledge money to public television or radio
1553 Read Kerouac, Ginsberg, Corso, and Burroughs
1531 Read the Beatitudes
1542 Sing in a glee club, a capella group, or barbershop quartet
1560 Spend a few days in a place where you are the minority
15558 Tell everyone special to you that you love them
1540 Wear a virtual reality helmet
1532 Win an amateur photography competition

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Posted in Monthly Checklists

Monthly List: October 2015

1172 Be in the headlines
1200 Buy nothing for a weekend – not even public transportation
1174 Direct a movie
1195 Dye your eyebrows
1190 Embellish the good old stories
1198 Examine a Whopper under a microscope
1197 Examine you tear under a microscope
1193 Float in the Dead Sea
1191 Get your PDA in perfect shape
1178 Jam at the Village Vanguard
1196 Learn Double Dutch
1188 Leave the bed unmade, the toilet seat up, and the toothpaste cap off – just once
1187 Leave the place in better shape than you found it
1183 Lose with true dignity
1176 Moonlight with you hobby
1186 Outfox the bean counters
1181 Pitch a no-hitter
1189 Plant an indoor herb garden
1182 Play “The Star Spangled Banner” like Hendrix did
1180 Play in the majors
1171 Pose for a full-page ad
1184 Relearn “walk the doggie” with your yo-yo
1177 Sell something by direct mail
1185 Send unsigned valentines to people in the office
1194 Spend the night in a pyramid
1173 Star in the show
1175 Take a mountain bike to the Ozarks
1199 Teach yourself how to repair an engine
1179 Throw strikes
1192 Write out your plan for life

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Posted in Monthly Checklists

Monthly List: October 2014

823 Accept ambiguity
826 Ask to spend the night in jail
834 Be a colonel in the war on poverty
832 Climb every mountain
831 Cut your own name in stone so it will last forever
816 Dive off a cliff into the water
820 Drink the milk from a coconut with a straw
822 Embrace chaos
833 Ford every stream
836 Get a doctorate
840 Get into the highest tax bracket
838 Get out of debt
817 Go back to your grade school and see if you can climb the rope to the top
824 Have enough to retire gracefully
829 Have five or six showerheads
815 Imagine the most pleasurable ________(fill-in-the-blank)
830 Keep meetings short and productive
819 Know the difference between aa and pahoehoe
821 Love to loaf, loaf to live, and live to loaf
811 Print your motto on your personal checks
814 Reinvent the wheel
813 Slide down the brass fire pole
827 Swim with the sharks
837 Take a course at or get a degree from Harvard
835 Take the ferry to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty
828 Thwart a mugger
818 Use a chain saw and a wood chipper
825 Walk across a suspension bridge
812 Watch a building being demolished or blown up
839 Wear silk pajamas

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Posted in Monthly Checklists

Monthly List: October 2013

458 Adopt a whale
457 Be a mentor
455 Be someone’s hero
454 Become an expert
471 Build an igloo
480 Buy a car with cash
461 Christmas carol with candles
470 Collect scrimshaw
469 Collect seashells
462 Dress up and have some brandy at a piano bar, preferably while Bobby Short performs
452 Get seduced
463 Hang a hammock in your living room
476 Harmonize
456 Have a mentor
459 Have high tea
453 Indulge
475 Learn to love wrinkles
479 Pay off your mortgage
451 Seduce someone
466 Send a message in a bottle
464 Send your dog to your neighbor’s house with a message attached to his collar
472 Skate a perfect figure-eight
460 Sleep naked
477 Sleep on sun-dried sheets
468 Smile at someone on the subway
474 Spin a child
473 Spin the perfect yarn
467 Study pebbles
465 Submit your manuscript
478 Take a few weeks off and read all of Remembrance of Things Past

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Posted in Monthly Checklists

Monthly List: October 2012

109 Attend a Democratic or Republican convention
118 Be the captain of a ship, a spaceship, or a submarine
115 Bungee-jump off a bridge
107 Bust (perform for money) in a European country
104 Compete in the eco-challenge
112 Crochet or knit a sweater
101 Dry some flowers
100 Experience 1000 types of love
116 Finish a marathon (without throwing up)
119 Go on a scientific expedition
106 Go on a silent retreat
102 Have a tremendous, rollicking, soaking wet water pistol fight
117 Horseback-ride on a Costa Rican beach at dawn, clothing optional
091 Learn French, German, or Swahili
099 Paint polka dots on your sneakers
114 Parasail
092 Pogo stick with children
103 Prepare a 7 course meal for 10 of your closest friends
098 Protect the innocent
110 Protest a Democratic or Republican convention
094 Ride an ostrich
108 Ride in a dune buggy
097 Ride the Coney Island Cyclone 3 times in a row
105 Scuba dive in the waters of Micronesia
095 Spend a day with a toddler
111 Start a new political party
120 Teach someone to read
113 Travel alone
093 Unicycle
096 Volunteer at the monkey house at the zoo

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.