Posted in Drinks Galore, It's Artistic/Creative

I CAN Be an Artist

It seems there is a growing trend of learn-to-paint classes, which encourage novice artists to gather with a group of friends and create a piece of artwork, all while enjoying a cocktail or two.

This is not an item written down to check off my list, but it is something I’ve thought would be fun. March 2014, I went with a bunch of friends in my Active 20-30 Club to a place in town called the Painted Cork.

Have you ever felt like taking a painting class to unleash your inner Picasso, but felt as though you couldn’t even paint a stick figure? Are you looking for something different and new to do for a birthday party, ladies night out, team builder, first date, couples or even as a single person who is looking for some unique social interaction in the Folsom or Midtown Sacramento area? The Painted Cork “paint and sip” Art Studio creates a comfortable, fun, hip and exciting atmosphere where you and your friends can enjoy a fantastic time while a professional art instructor teaches you a step by step 2 to 3 hour painting classes. The Painted Cork offers a completely relaxed and social painting class/party where guests are allowed to bring with them their favorite wine or beer and delicious snacks to enjoy throughout the class!

I’m definitely not an artist, so I was guessing that my painting would turn out really bad. Got to the place and found the easels and paints all set up at tables. The artist instructor told me to grab an apron and then drinks, snacks, and a seat. I put down the bottle of wine and snack mix I brought and grabbed a glass and apron and a seat. The canvas had a penciled outline of the skyline we were going to be painting. Up front there were different paintings that were completed, the instructor told us to take a look at each one to use as a baseline for inspiration or ours. Then we started painting.

It was a very simple step by step processing. Mixing colors and watching what she did and then doing similar. By doing it this way, I realized that each person is different in how they paint the same object. This in turn means that no one is a bad artist. I don’t think I’d be able to do a painting like that without watching the steps to get it done.

Overall, it was a very fun evening and I’d totally do this again. I can see why it’s become so popular.

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Posted in Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, Super Duper Easy

Know the difference between ʻAʻā and Pāhoehoe

Time to look up the words in Wikipedia. Turns out these words are for two different types of Lava.

Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

ʻAʻā means “stony rough lava”, but also to “burn” or “blaze”) is one of three basic types of flow lava. ʻAʻā is basaltic lava characterized by a rough or rubbly surface composed of broken lava blocks called clinker. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

The loose, broken, and sharp, spiny surface of an ʻaʻā flow makes hiking difficult and slow. The clinkery surface actually covers a massive dense core, which is the most active part of the flow. As pasty lava in the core travels downslope, the clinkers are carried along at the surface. At the leading edge of an ʻaʻā flow, however, these cooled fragments tumble down the steep front and are buried by the advancing flow. This produces a layer of lava fragments both at the bottom and top of an ʻaʻā flow.

Accretionary lava balls as large as 3 metres (10 feet) are common on ʻaʻā flows. ʻAʻā is usually of higher viscosity than pāhoehoe. Pāhoehoe can turn into ʻaʻā if it becomes turbulent from meeting impediments or steep slopes. ʻAʻā lavas typically erupt at temperatures of 1000 to 1100 °C.

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Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

Pāhoehoe means “smooth, unbroken lava”), also spelled pahoehoe, is basaltic lava that has a smooth, billowy, undulating, or ropy surface. These surface features are due to the movement of very fluid lava under a congealing surface crust. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

A pāhoehoe flow typically advances as a series of small lobes and toes that continually break out from a cooled crust. It also forms lava tubes where the minimal heat loss maintains low viscosity. The surface texture of pāhoehoe flows varies widely, displaying all kinds of bizarre shapes often referred to as lava sculpture. With increasing distance from the source, pāhoehoe flows may change into ʻaʻā flows in response to heat loss and consequent increase in viscosity. Pahoehoe lavas typically have a temperature of 1100 to 1200 °C.

And that concludes the lesson for the day. Bucket List mission accomplished!

Posted in Drinks Galore, Super Duper Easy

Have a V-8

I used to drink V-8 as a kid ALL THE TIME. Then got sick of it and couldn’t stand drinking it anymore. Recently I’ve been drinking it again, and back to enjoying it. Now, V-8 has also created fusion drinks with fruit added. Will try one of those some point.

I also want to try juicing my own V-8 some time. But at least I can check this off my list of things to do.

I always think of those old V-8 commercials when people are walking around sideways until they have a drink.

Posted in Monthly Checklists

Monthly List: March 2017

1706 Act out a fairy tale
1699 Be a Beatnik, Hippie, Punk, or Rude Boy
1685 Be a write-in on the ballot
1707 Be Ringmaster for a day at Ringling Brothers
1708 Be the person who pulls or announces the Lotto numbers on TV
1683 Become so good at white water rafting that you can be a guide on the most difficult rivers
1709 Bounce at the Viper Room
1689 Celebrate your hairdresser at the Barbering Hall of Fame
1703 Climb the slippery slope
1694 Comfort the afflicted
1696 Compete in the Elephant Polo Tournament in Nepal
1705 Compose a fairy tale
1686 Design a musical instrument
1710 Dust off them blue suede shoes
1701 Gather up your friends for a quilting bee
1682 Go back and spend the night at your old sleepaway camp
1704 Have Bangers and Mash
1691 Learn to recognize Iambic pentameter
1702 Learn to throw your voice
1695 Make a weekly visit to your local library
1692 Overcome adversity
1693 Survive
1681 Sing at a wedding
1684 Skate the lead in the Ice Capades
1697 Skitch
1687 Sponsor a needy child
1690 Start your own cosmetics line
1700 Tell your children you were a Beatnik, Hippie, Punk, or Rude Boy
1688 Travel the world by reading
1698 Turn out the lights and watch Wait Until Dark

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.