Posted in Generic Ones, Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, Super Duper Easy

Learn at Least 3 Palindromes

First I had to look up the definition because I couldn’t quite remember what it is.

It is is a word, phrase, number, or other sequence of symbols or elements, whose meaning may be interpreted the same way in either forward or reverse direction.

Oh, well in that case, it will be easy to learn and list.

Noon
Murder for a jar of red rum
16461
(and one more for good measure) Mom

Do you have any favorites?

 

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Posted in Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, Super Duper Easy

Know the difference between ʻAʻā and Pāhoehoe

Time to look up the words in Wikipedia. Turns out these words are for two different types of Lava.

Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

ʻAʻā means “stony rough lava”, but also to “burn” or “blaze”) is one of three basic types of flow lava. ʻAʻā is basaltic lava characterized by a rough or rubbly surface composed of broken lava blocks called clinker. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

The loose, broken, and sharp, spiny surface of an ʻaʻā flow makes hiking difficult and slow. The clinkery surface actually covers a massive dense core, which is the most active part of the flow. As pasty lava in the core travels downslope, the clinkers are carried along at the surface. At the leading edge of an ʻaʻā flow, however, these cooled fragments tumble down the steep front and are buried by the advancing flow. This produces a layer of lava fragments both at the bottom and top of an ʻaʻā flow.

Accretionary lava balls as large as 3 metres (10 feet) are common on ʻaʻā flows. ʻAʻā is usually of higher viscosity than pāhoehoe. Pāhoehoe can turn into ʻaʻā if it becomes turbulent from meeting impediments or steep slopes. ʻAʻā lavas typically erupt at temperatures of 1000 to 1100 °C.

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Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

Pāhoehoe means “smooth, unbroken lava”), also spelled pahoehoe, is basaltic lava that has a smooth, billowy, undulating, or ropy surface. These surface features are due to the movement of very fluid lava under a congealing surface crust. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

A pāhoehoe flow typically advances as a series of small lobes and toes that continually break out from a cooled crust. It also forms lava tubes where the minimal heat loss maintains low viscosity. The surface texture of pāhoehoe flows varies widely, displaying all kinds of bizarre shapes often referred to as lava sculpture. With increasing distance from the source, pāhoehoe flows may change into ʻaʻā flows in response to heat loss and consequent increase in viscosity. Pahoehoe lavas typically have a temperature of 1100 to 1200 °C.

And that concludes the lesson for the day. Bucket List mission accomplished!