Posted in Requires Travel

Wear a lei

Found a photo taken after a trip to Hawaii in 1987, where my sister and I are wearing lei’s. No interesting story to it. Cannot remember if some friends that moved to Hawaii gave us these or we bought them.

Wanted to include this postcard photo that we posed and paid with birds. It was a fun touristy thing to do.

Have you been lei’d? Any interesting story to it?

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Posted in Generic Ones, Super Duper Easy

#1833 Wear flowers in your hair or lapels

I LOVE these simple kind of items to check off.

You can easily accomplish this by picking a flower and putting it in your hair or lapel. I remember making daisy chains as a kid, they only lasted a very short time. You can also just stick one flower behind your ear. But make sure which ear it is (some people will see you as being taken (left) or single (right)).

Here’s a photo of my sis, mom, and I at a luau in Hawaii.

Sometime I ought to wear flowers when I visit San Francisco while listening to that song. Have you done that? Or interesting events, ways you wore flowers?

Posted in Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, Super Duper Easy

#819 – Know the difference between ʻAʻā and Pāhoehoe

Time to look up the words in Wikipedia. Turns out these words are for two different types of Lava.

Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

ʻAʻā means “stony rough lava”, but also to “burn” or “blaze”) is one of three basic types of flow lava. ʻAʻā is basaltic lava characterized by a rough or rubbly surface composed of broken lava blocks called clinker. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

The loose, broken, and sharp, spiny surface of an ʻaʻā flow makes hiking difficult and slow. The clinkery surface actually covers a massive dense core, which is the most active part of the flow. As pasty lava in the core travels downslope, the clinkers are carried along at the surface. At the leading edge of an ʻaʻā flow, however, these cooled fragments tumble down the steep front and are buried by the advancing flow. This produces a layer of lava fragments both at the bottom and top of an ʻaʻā flow.

Accretionary lava balls as large as 3 metres (10 feet) are common on ʻaʻā flows. ʻAʻā is usually of higher viscosity than pāhoehoe. Pāhoehoe can turn into ʻaʻā if it becomes turbulent from meeting impediments or steep slopes. ʻAʻā lavas typically erupt at temperatures of 1000 to 1100 °C.

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Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

Pāhoehoe means “smooth, unbroken lava”), also spelled pahoehoe, is basaltic lava that has a smooth, billowy, undulating, or ropy surface. These surface features are due to the movement of very fluid lava under a congealing surface crust. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

A pāhoehoe flow typically advances as a series of small lobes and toes that continually break out from a cooled crust. It also forms lava tubes where the minimal heat loss maintains low viscosity. The surface texture of pāhoehoe flows varies widely, displaying all kinds of bizarre shapes often referred to as lava sculpture. With increasing distance from the source, pāhoehoe flows may change into ʻaʻā flows in response to heat loss and consequent increase in viscosity. Pahoehoe lavas typically have a temperature of 1100 to 1200 °C.

And that concludes the lesson for the day. Bucket List mission accomplished!

Posted in Bon Appetite, Drinks Galore, Requires Travel

#18 Drink the Milk From a Coconut With a Straw

My sister is currently living in Hawaii so it is a tad more than just visiting her when I go. It’s very much a vacation in paradise. There are tons of “bucket” list adventures to cross off when on a tropical island. This was one from the book.

I had visited my sister in 2011 as a birthday vacation. We did quite a few items, like my first time stand-up paddling. While we were out on the beach, one of her co-workers went and chopped down a few coconuts from trees nearby. Then they cut into the coconuts so I could drink from it. (I had mentioned this being a checklist item to my sister, so she asked him to get them as a birthday treat).coconut 2 There were no straws, but you can’t beat having it fresh right? After we drank the juice (which was more like water then milk), they cut more of the coconut (which took a lot more chopping than I would have thought) and we dug out the meat. I’m not a fan of coconut, but it was fun to eat it still in the shell and so fresh.coconut 1Maybe, I’ll go buy one at the store (or better yet, have another opportunity in Hawaii like this) and use a straw. In the meantime, I’m counting this as mission accomplished.

Have you had any coconut related experiences?