Grow Long Hair

& Donate to Wigs For Kids

I can check off 2 items for this one “Grow Long Hair” and “Donate to…”

Back in 2013 a friend mentioned she was going to start growing out her hair and donate to Locks of Love. I thought, why not do that too!! When I mentioned it to my hair stylist, she told me to look at other organizations that create wigs for children. People assume the wigs they make and give to kids are free. It’s not true. Plus, it is mostly for children that suffer alopecia areata (a type of hair loss). Not to say that is not also important to give wigs to kids that have that, but I was thinking of donating toward a wig for a child that has to deal with cancer (or wider range of reasons a child lost their hair). Researching more, I found they use a sliding fee based on parent’s income. And even though they accept at least 10 inches of pretty much any type of hair (even dyed), they don’t use all of it. Some they sell off. Maybe to help keep costs of making the wigs down, but that was still unclear to me.

I was disillusioned with Locks of Love and started looking for other organizations that fit more with what I wanted my hair to be donated for. I came across Wigs for Kids. “For children who have lost their hair due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, Alopecia, Trichotillomania, burns and other medical issues at no cost to children or their families.” And as far as I can tell, they work to make the wigs complimentary to children.

Side note: I saw on the Wigs for Kids website they have a Girl Scout patch for donating. Where was that when I was a Scout? Would have been fun to earn.

The requirements for Wigs for Kids is at least 12 inches and no chemical treatment to the hair. I figured I can do this challenge and let my hair grow long. It had been quite a challenge for me. I usually keep my hair chin length and anytime it starts to touch my shoulders I chop it off. It’s also quite thick, so when I do the chop, I can feel the weight come off my head. I’ve liked to dye it a reddish color. Growing up it stayed a light brown due to me swimming year round. When I stopped swimming, it went back to my natural color which is a very dark brown and I was very much not used to that. Friends even asked if I dyed my hair.

It took about 4 years to grow, and as soon as I could, I chopped it off as part of a birthday treat for myself. I got it layered and colored.

The back ponytail reached 12 inches but the other ponytails were a tad short. Plan B, donate that one ponytail to Wigs for Kids and the rest to PanteneBeautiful Lengths program. They provide free wigs for women battling cancer. Their requirements were at least 8 inches and color free. Done!!

It was fun to grow out my hair to see how it looked and felt. People said long hair looks good on me. I might grow it out long again but this time style it more than just an even cut and see how that looks. And down the road, I might donate it again. I hope that little bit of hair will help add to making a wig for a child and a woman and bring a smile to their faces.

Have you donated your hair? What organization and how was your experience?

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Who’s on First?

AKA – Express absurd opinions seriously and see who listens

What’s in the quotes is the item to be checked off from the book. I could probably come up with a few discussions that I took very seriously and have it turn out to be quite mis-leading or absurd. And I am sure my “friends” could share more than I even imagine. The other side to it, is that I am NOT the only person in those absurd but serious conversations. There were one or more others that contributed. In the end, I think we couldn’t keep straight faces any longer and busted up laughing.

While I was thinking about different conversations to write about and check this item off, there was one that relates to the famous sketch that Abbott & Costello performed; “Who’s on First?” This is a PERFECT example of expressing absurd comments, maybe not opinions, but it fits.

My mom, sis, and I were in line for movie tickets one day. I don’t recall how it came up, but my sis and I started trying to recall the Who’s on First? skit. We might have argued, seriously, on what were the correct lines or not. It definitely entertained our mom, and the guy in line behind us. Finally, he couldn’t help but remark that it was neat hearing us talk about a skit from comedians that were from a black & white era of tv show, NOT to mention first starting their careers on radio shows. He was impressed.

I love watching skits from the “black & white” comedy era. Especially when they cracked themselves up during the skit. There are some “color” era comedians that did that too, Carol Burnett and Tim Conway skits come to mind.

I’m going to make it easy and leave you with the Who’s on First? skit found on YouTube to enjoy.

Have you expressed absurd opinions seriously?

Make Your Own Lunch

Not really sure why this is a “must do before you die” item listed in the book. Maybe because we’ve gotten to the point where one can easily never make their own lunches. It’s either made for the person (like when we are kids and our parents made them) or fast food, store bought pre-made stuff, or going to places like subway.

During the weekday, I am able to come home at lunchtime and make something to eat and relax. Every once in a while, I’ve made a salad the night before. Typically I’ll have a wheat wrap, a slice of cheese, and two slices of turkey. No mayo and often no mustard (because I am lazy and don’t want to add the extra bit of effort) So, while it’s a bit dry, I’m fine with it.

lunch 1Then I’ll add chips or fruit.

And Bon Appetite! Mission accomplished for this book item!

Do you make your own lunch?

I CAN Be an Artist

It seems there is a growing trend of learn-to-paint classes, which encourage novice artists to gather with a group of friends and create a piece of artwork, all while enjoying a cocktail or two.

This is not an item written down to check off my list, but it is something I’ve thought would be fun. March 2014, I went with a bunch of friends in my Active 20-30 Club to a place in town called the Painted Cork.

Have you ever felt like taking a painting class to unleash your inner Picasso, but felt as though you couldn’t even paint a stick figure? Are you looking for something different and new to do for a birthday party, ladies night out, team builder, first date, couples or even as a single person who is looking for some unique social interaction in the Folsom or Midtown Sacramento area? The Painted Cork “paint and sip” Art Studio creates a comfortable, fun, hip and exciting atmosphere where you and your friends can enjoy a fantastic time while a professional art instructor teaches you a step by step 2 to 3 hour painting classes. The Painted Cork offers a completely relaxed and social painting class/party where guests are allowed to bring with them their favorite wine or beer and delicious snacks to enjoy throughout the class!

I’m definitely not an artist, so I was guessing that my painting would turn out really bad. Got to the place and found the easels and paints all set up at tables. The artist instructor told me to grab an apron and then drinks, snacks, and a seat. I put down the bottle of wine and snack mix I brought and grabbed a glass and apron and a seat. The canvas had a penciled outline of the skyline we were going to be painting. Up front there were different paintings that were completed, the instructor told us to take a look at each one to use as a baseline for inspiration or ours. Then we started painting.

It was a very simple step by step processing. Mixing colors and watching what she did and then doing similar. By doing it this way, I realized that each person is different in how they paint the same object. This in turn means that no one is a bad artist. I don’t think I’d be able to do a painting like that without watching the steps to get it done.

Overall, it was a very fun evening and I’d totally do this again. I can see why it’s become so popular.

Know the difference between ʻAʻā and Pāhoehoe

Time to look up the words in Wikipedia. Turns out these words are for two different types of Lava.

Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

ʻAʻā means “stony rough lava”, but also to “burn” or “blaze”) is one of three basic types of flow lava. ʻAʻā is basaltic lava characterized by a rough or rubbly surface composed of broken lava blocks called clinker. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

The loose, broken, and sharp, spiny surface of an ʻaʻā flow makes hiking difficult and slow. The clinkery surface actually covers a massive dense core, which is the most active part of the flow. As pasty lava in the core travels downslope, the clinkers are carried along at the surface. At the leading edge of an ʻaʻā flow, however, these cooled fragments tumble down the steep front and are buried by the advancing flow. This produces a layer of lava fragments both at the bottom and top of an ʻaʻā flow.

Accretionary lava balls as large as 3 metres (10 feet) are common on ʻaʻā flows. ʻAʻā is usually of higher viscosity than pāhoehoe. Pāhoehoe can turn into ʻaʻā if it becomes turbulent from meeting impediments or steep slopes. ʻAʻā lavas typically erupt at temperatures of 1000 to 1100 °C.

________________________________________________

Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

Pāhoehoe means “smooth, unbroken lava”), also spelled pahoehoe, is basaltic lava that has a smooth, billowy, undulating, or ropy surface. These surface features are due to the movement of very fluid lava under a congealing surface crust. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

A pāhoehoe flow typically advances as a series of small lobes and toes that continually break out from a cooled crust. It also forms lava tubes where the minimal heat loss maintains low viscosity. The surface texture of pāhoehoe flows varies widely, displaying all kinds of bizarre shapes often referred to as lava sculpture. With increasing distance from the source, pāhoehoe flows may change into ʻaʻā flows in response to heat loss and consequent increase in viscosity. Pahoehoe lavas typically have a temperature of 1100 to 1200 °C.

And that concludes the lesson for the day. Bucket List mission accomplished!

Permit Yourself to Like a Piece of Art Without Knowing Why

I have enjoyed several pieces of art without really knowing why. It truly is amazing the way artists can capture moments or inspire emotions with abstract. And the different types out there: charcoal, water colors, oils, photography, just to name a few mediums.

I wish I had a fun game room and could afford some paintings from Michael Godard. I first saw his olive and grape paintings on a cruise ship a few years ago. He’s my most recent favorite. The paintings are just so much fun to look at.Michael_Godard_I_Lost_My_MarblesDo you have a favorite artist? Own any of the paintings? Do you like a piece just because?

Drink the Milk From a Coconut With a Straw

My sister is currently living in Hawaii so it is a tad more than just visiting her when I go. It’s very much a vacation in paradise. There are tons of “bucket” list adventures to cross off when on a tropical island. This was one from the book.

I had visited my sister in 2011 as a birthday vacation. We did quite a few items, like my first time stand-up paddling. While we were out on the beach, one of her co-workers went and chopped down a few coconuts from trees nearby. Then they cut into the coconuts so I could drink from it. (I had mentioned this being a checklist item to my sister, so she asked him to get them as a birthday treat).coconut 2 There were no straws, but you can’t beat having it fresh right? After we drank the juice (which was more like water then milk), they cut more of the coconut (which took a lot more chopping than I would have thought) and we dug out the meat. I’m not a fan of coconut, but it was fun to eat it still in the shell and so fresh.coconut 1Maybe, I’ll go buy one at the store (or better yet, have another opportunity in Hawaii like this) and use a straw. In the meantime, I’m counting this as mission accomplished.

Have you had any coconut related experiences?

Stop Making New Year’s Resolutions

No New ResolutionsWhat does a “resolution” really mean? According to Merriam Webster’s Dictionary it has lots of different meanings, but the part that probably matters for this subject is that it; “is the act of answering, the act of determining, something that is resolved (made a – to mend my ways)”. Taking a close look at the word and definition shows me that it doesn’t really fit what people mean for it to be at the beginning of each year. I guess they are determining what they want to do for the next calendar year, but should it really be labeled a “resolution”?

I have stopped making New Year’s resolutions and started making goals for that year. Planning a trip or two and continuing some goals that I have to keep improving myself, such as working on a healthy and fit lifestyle & keeping life interesting. I think that is a much better way to welcome in the new year, you have a whole 12 months to schedule and plan and have fun with.

heartI recently saw this cartoon from The Awkward Yeti that also shows why one should stop making resolutions. It has an argument supporting both sides, but I liked the brain telling the heart that it’s really just another day of the year. No reason to treat it as something new. But just like sometimes it’s fun to have a start date for a something to work on; the first of the year, the first of the month, even the first of the week helps make it fun to celebrate. To note that on THIS DAY I’ll begin this journey to completing that goal or project.

Do you keep making New Year’s Resolutions? Have you stopped? Do you treat the New Year as a start for a goal or treat it as just another day?

Monthly List: December 2014

895 Abolish the death penalty
879 Address the nation
880 Administer the Heimlich maneuver successfully
871 Be a pen pal
872 Bring back, and update, the Roman orgy
884 Comfort the afflicted
892 Depose a witness
887 Enjoy at least one bad habit
889 Enter a Pro-Am tournament
893 Exorcize demons
881 Float
891 Go down into a coal mine
897 Have an architect design the house in your head
888 Hike in the Swiss Alps
885 Hire someone to wrap all your Christmas presents
876 Hit the bell at a carnival
882 Introduce two people who soon get married
896 Make a list of all your desires
890 Pan for gold
894 Partake in a demonstration
899 Play detective
883 Profess your loves and hates
898 Reach the peak of Kilimanjaro
878 Read Rainer Maria Rilke
877 Ride a motorcycle south on US 1 in California
875 See Stonehenge and join the Druids
874 Take a child with you to cut down a Christmas tree on a snowy night
900 Walk on stilts
886 Ward off an invasion
873 Water-ski in your bare feet

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Monthly List: November 2014

863 Audition for a part in Oklahoma!
855 Be in a chase scene
848 Be known as a heretic
844 Be nimble, spry, lithe, and elastic
860 Bowl a 300
851 Develop a taste for Scotch, Profofiev, or Pynchon
846 Drop ten pounds
854 Execute a perfect Chevy Chase pratfall
853 Fall asleep counting your blessings
856 Fence
866 Find a masterpiece at a garage sale
859 Get good-really good-at pool and darts
852 Give a keynote address
869 Grow long hair
858 Learn to use a gun, but never have to
857 Mambo
867 Meet your lover at the door wearing nothing but Saran Wrap
841 One day spend $1000 in cash on at least six things
850 Pursue the one you love
868 Ride a winged horse
845 Run a personal ad
865 See the Loch Ness monster
842 Show off your fifty-yard-line tickets for the Army-Navy game
849 Think of sex as a gourmet dinner
843 Throw your own tailgate party
847 Travel around the world by sailboat
861 Wander in the Scottish heather
862 Weave
864 Whale watch
870 Win an apology and a fat refund from the IRS

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Monthly List: October 2014

823 Accept ambiguity
826 Ask to spend the night in jail
834 Be a colonel in the war on poverty
832 Climb every mountain
831 Cut your own name in stone so it will last forever
816 Dive off a cliff into the water
820 Drink the milk from a coconut with a straw
822 Embrace chaos
833 Ford every stream
836 Get a doctorate
840 Get into the highest tax bracket
838 Get out of debt
817 Go back to your grade school and see if you can climb the rope to the top
824 Have enough to retire gracefully
829 Have five or six showerheads
815 Imagine the most pleasurable ________(fill-in-the-blank)
830 Keep meetings short and productive
819 Know the difference between aa and pahoehoe
821 Love to loaf, loaf to live, and live to loaf
811 Print your motto on your personal checks
814 Reinvent the wheel
813 Slide down the brass fire pole
827 Swim with the sharks
837 Take a course at or get a degree from Harvard
835 Take the ferry to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty
828 Thwart a mugger
818 Use a chain saw and a wood chipper
825 Walk across a suspension bridge
812 Watch a building being demolished or blown up
839 Wear silk pajamas

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Monthly List: September 2014

804 *69 someone
783 Attend an outdoor bluegrass festival
807 Climb the cone of a volcano
808 Cut the cord and, if necessary, the apron strings
792 Date a supermodel
782 Eat dessert first
797 Finish a game of Risk
802 Get a facial
795 Get paid what you are worth and vice versa
809 Get to know your neighbors
799 Grow a handlebar mustache or mutton chops
787 Have a booth at a fea market
785 Have a closet lined in cedar
789 Have a fireplace or a wood stove
810 Have a vegetable garden
793 Improve something in the world besides yourself
786 Improve your doodles
788 Install a skylight over your bed
806 Join a volunteer fire department
790 Join the polar bear club
784 Learn to play a fiddle or ukulele
805 Live in a yurt or a tepee for a while
781 Overdo a good thing
803 Risk saying no more often
796 Send dozens of postcards for no particular reason
800 Stop at a cathedral at night when it’s empty
794 Take a natural vacation at a nudist colony
801 talk with your mouth full
791 Till a field
798 Write a long, interesting letter to faraway friends

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Monthly List: August 2014

751 Appreciate gray hair
752 Coin a phrase
780 Compete in a potato sack race
763 Dance down the staircase like Fred Astaire
767 Develop an air of mystery
756 Develop your own recipe for chili
753 Don’t get soft
778 Express absurd opinions seriously and see who listens
776 Figure out how to make enough money
771 Get a gold tooth, or have it capped
777 Have only one PIN number
769 Have phone sex
757 Listen to Bessie Smith
758 Make your own lunch
768 Mend a broken heart
772 Own an expensive diamond
764 Perform one of Houdini’s tricks
775 Permit yourself to like a piece of art without knowing why
770 Prick pretentiousness and snobbery
760 Proclaim a holiday
762 Prophesy prosperity
761 Say things like “eureka,” “hallelujah,” and “balderdash”
765 Shed your inhibitions two-by-two
766 Shout “Bravo” at the end of a good movie
779 Teach leadership
754 Visit an ice cream truck
755 Vote for equal rights every time
759 Wear a scarlet A and see what happens
773 Write a long stream-of-consciousness note to yourself
774 Yell like Tarzan and howl like a coyote

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Monthly List: July 2014

733 Address the United Nations
745 Always be too young to take up golf
728 Buy a sarong
721 Come of age
748 Eat your vegetables
750 Enjoy the moment without expecting it to last
735 Feed and shelter the homeless
722 Get a bit part on a TV sitcom or a starring role in a primetime reality show
739 Go to a bed-and-breakfast one week from today
734 Hang a prism
730 Have a cookout that ends with S’mores
723 Have your portrait painted in oils
742 Leave love notes in large print
744 Plan the dreams you want to have when you’re asleep
731 Put twenty bucks in the slots or on a nag
737 Ride in a cherry picker
725 Say good-bye to your therapist
727 Separate from your significant other for one month
747 Stretch every muscle every day
738 Swing from limb to limb
726 Take everything off your desk and start all over
746 Take up golf
743 Tango
732 Tell ghost stories in a pitch-black room
724 Try group therapy and don’t hold back
741 Turn off all the lights and slow dance on the porch
749 Unearth an amazing archaeological discovery
736 Visit the sick
729 Write a personal note on every Christmas card
740 Write or paint directly from your subconscious

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.

Monthly List: June 2014

694 Add a codicil to your will that tells people why you love them
691 Bask in the glow of praise
714 Be known for your toasts
700 Climb way up in a weeping willow or old copper beech tree
699 Collect autographs
698 Collect large African insects
720 Get good at black and white photography
707 Get to at least one opening day of baseball
692 Give something wonderful anonymously
715 Go on a Safari
717 Hang a spoon from your nose
703 Have a great bumper sticker
712 Have a hideout
710 Have an epic interest in people
695 Have only one or two credit cards
713 Have your favorite books bound in leather
718 Keep an aquarium
696 Know the best public restrooms in major cities
693 Leave someone a surprise in your will
705 Listen to the original Jerky Boys tape
701 Listen to whales
702 Make some mean old sourpuss laugh
704 Perfect your pet impersonations
711 Practice smiling
697 Read the Bible as history and literature
708 Realize it’s not un-American to hate baseball
719 Share the wealth
706 Sit on the fifty-yard line at the Super Bowl
716 Write “If only I had…” on a piece of paper and flush it down the toilet
709 Write out your wish list

Every month I am taking 30 items from the 2001 Things to Do book and creating a short checklist. I am using this as inspiration to work on crossing things off the list, maybe not particularly from that month, but overall to do something different. This is not necessarily a “bucket list”; it is a goal that by doing something new (or doing something I’ve done before but hadn’t documented it with photos or journaling) I will keep from feeling in a rut. I will be able to look back at the little, big, sad, happy, joyful, or heart thumping moments and feel my life has value.

One of my favorite quotes is:

“A good life is a collection of happy moments” by Dennis Waitley

This is a reminder to myself of why I have this blog. I’m working through posting all the items from the book and beyond, to keep in mind to do something. To get out there for experiences and adventures.

I’d love to hear if you have done any of these. Or if you have other ideas to try.