Posted in Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, Super Duper Easy

#819 – Know the difference between ʻAʻā and Pāhoehoe

Time to look up the words in Wikipedia. Turns out these words are for two different types of Lava.

Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

ʻAʻā means “stony rough lava”, but also to “burn” or “blaze”) is one of three basic types of flow lava. ʻAʻā is basaltic lava characterized by a rough or rubbly surface composed of broken lava blocks called clinker. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

The loose, broken, and sharp, spiny surface of an ʻaʻā flow makes hiking difficult and slow. The clinkery surface actually covers a massive dense core, which is the most active part of the flow. As pasty lava in the core travels downslope, the clinkers are carried along at the surface. At the leading edge of an ʻaʻā flow, however, these cooled fragments tumble down the steep front and are buried by the advancing flow. This produces a layer of lava fragments both at the bottom and top of an ʻaʻā flow.

Accretionary lava balls as large as 3 metres (10 feet) are common on ʻaʻā flows. ʻAʻā is usually of higher viscosity than pāhoehoe. Pāhoehoe can turn into ʻaʻā if it becomes turbulent from meeting impediments or steep slopes. ʻAʻā lavas typically erupt at temperatures of 1000 to 1100 °C.

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Photo from United States Geological Survey (USGS)

Pāhoehoe means “smooth, unbroken lava”), also spelled pahoehoe, is basaltic lava that has a smooth, billowy, undulating, or ropy surface. These surface features are due to the movement of very fluid lava under a congealing surface crust. The Hawaiian word was introduced as a technical term in geology by Clarence Dutton.

A pāhoehoe flow typically advances as a series of small lobes and toes that continually break out from a cooled crust. It also forms lava tubes where the minimal heat loss maintains low viscosity. The surface texture of pāhoehoe flows varies widely, displaying all kinds of bizarre shapes often referred to as lava sculpture. With increasing distance from the source, pāhoehoe flows may change into ʻaʻā flows in response to heat loss and consequent increase in viscosity. Pahoehoe lavas typically have a temperature of 1100 to 1200 °C.

And that concludes the lesson for the day. Bucket List mission accomplished!

Posted in Generic Ones, Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, Super Duper Easy

#83 – Become Familiar with Duende

What does Duende mean? According to the dictionary, it is “the power to attract through personal magnetism and charm.”

If you look up the word on Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s webpage, it  also includes this information: “Did You Know? The word duende refers to a spirit in Spanish, Portuguese, and Filipino folklore and literally means “ghost” or “goblin” in Spanish. It is believed to derive from the phrase “dueño de casa,” which means “owner of a house.” The term is traditionally used in flamenco music or other art forms to refer to the mystical or powerful force given off by a performer to draw in the audience. The Spanish poet Federico Garcia Lorca wrote in his essay “Teoria y Juego del Duende” (“Play and Theory of the Duende”) that duende “is a power and not a behavior . . . a struggle and not a concept.” Nowadays the term appears in a broader range of contexts to refer to one’s unspoken charm or allure.”

Let us see how “trusty” Wikipedia explains Duende. On that webpage it says it could be another name for an elf. Or can be mythological; an artistic expression in a dance; novels or poetry; German trance DJ’s; independent artist cooperative in Netherlands; or a Canadian song title.

I think I like the reference that it’s basically the Latin culture’s version of a leprechaun; believed to be a mischievous forest spirit.

Do you think we have now become familiar enough to be able to cross it off this list?

The TV show Glee mentions Duende in an episode with Ricky Martin guest appearing. Here is a scene that was fun to watch and made me want to jump up and join them.

Posted in Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, State of Mind, Super Duper Easy

#682 – Stop Making New Year’s Resolutions

No New ResolutionsWhat does a “resolution” really mean? According to Merriam Webster’s Dictionary it has lots of different meanings, but the part that probably matters for this subject is that it; “is the act of answering, the act of determining, something that is resolved (made a – to mend my ways)”. Taking a close look at the word and definition shows me that it doesn’t really fit what people mean for it to be at the beginning of each year. I guess they are determining what they want to do for the next calendar year, but should it really be labeled a “resolution”?

I have stopped making New Year’s resolutions and started making goals for that year. Planning a trip or two and continuing some goals that I have to keep improving myself, such as working on a healthy and fit lifestyle & keeping life interesting. I think that is a much better way to welcome in the new year, you have a whole 12 months to schedule and plan and have fun with.

heartI recently saw this cartoon from The Awkward Yeti that also shows why one should stop making resolutions. It has an argument supporting both sides, but I liked the brain telling the heart that it’s really just another day of the year. No reason to treat it as something new. But just like sometimes it’s fun to have a start date for a something to work on; the first of the year, the first of the month, even the first of the week helps make it fun to celebrate. To note that on THIS DAY I’ll begin this journey to completing that goal or project.

Do you keep making New Year’s Resolutions? Have you stopped? Do you treat the New Year as a start for a goal or treat it as just another day?

Posted in Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, Looking Forward to, Reading Materials, State of Mind, Super Duper Easy

Buy This Book!

2,001 Things to Do Before You Die by Dane Sherwood

This was listed on the last page of the book. My opinion is that this should have been the first thing you see.  I was browsing around the book store one day and saw this on one of the center tables that show off best sellers and random books. The “things to do before you die” grabbed my interest and I started browsing through it.

2001 Things to Do Book

My goal is to use this as inspiration to do new things. Or old things and find the photos and write a post. If I can’t find photos, maybe I will redo the experience. There are some that will make me ponder with deep thoughts. And I know there are some that no way I will be doing that item. No matter what, books like this one help change up that daily routine. There are plenty of simple, little, or big items that one can do to keep life from getting boring.

Have you bought this book? Send any recommendations of other books like this. 

Posted in Generic Ones, Learning Lessons/Research Discoveries, On This Day, Reading Materials, State of Mind, Super Duper Easy

On This Day: #224 – Read or listen closely to “I Have a Dream”

I originally had this already checked off the list.  I did some school project (probably a few times) with the “I have a dream” speech.

However, the nation is celebrating the 50 year anniversary of when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  marched for civil rights in Washington D.C. and gave this speech.  So, I think it is fitting that it gets it’s own post on the day of.

I’m white (I admit it) and you might say the civil rights he was talking about didn’t affect me.  But I would say back to you that it HAS affected me.  I have grown up in a world where there is integration of races (even of sexes) in so many parts of my life.  I watch those old movies and history documentaries and cannot even begin to imagine how weird it would be to be surrounded with only other whites (and mainly females).  If I think hard about it, I could list all the things I that might be different nowadays if the way things were back then hadn’t changed.

I know there are still places that might be unchanged, but not where I am and not in the many places I’ve been to.

And you have to admit, his speech is pretty universal and touches the nerve to all.

My final thought as I listen to this speech on the day it first was spoken 50 years before; having  President Obama speak it and show history how far we’ve come in our cultural prejudices is pretty darn neat.